Thursday, July 27, 2017

Revit Training for Lighting Designers

Next week I will be giving two talks at the BILT-NA conference in Toronto, Canada. One session is "What's New in Revit 2018" and the other "Luminaire Families for Experts".



I have had a number ...

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Revit 2018.1 - New Content, Part 3

The recent 2018.1 update comes with some new content, as I have already written about in these to previous posts:
Today I will take a look at the new systems furniture (i.e. cubical content).



This content is...

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Callout and Reference Label


Quick post today using an image I created to help answer a question from someone in our office about Callouts and Reference Labels.



The image describes...

Monday, July 24, 2017

Revit 2018.1 - New Content, Part 2

In my previous post, Revit 2018.1 - New Content, Part 1, I talked about the new appliance families provided with the Revit 2018.1 update. In this post I will cover the new window content. I had the opportunity to test drive the window content, with some of the Autodesk staff working on this, while I was at Revit: Inside the Factory in Shanghai China last October (2016). I am super excited to see a feature I recommended, and don't often see in Revit door/window content in general, was added to the final product; more on this later.
  • FYI: Keep in mind, this content is part of the 2018.1 update, but is fully compatible with the original Revit 2018 install. Click here to download the new content.
Window Content Preview in Windows Explorer

The new window content consists of...

Friday, July 21, 2017

Revit 2018.1 - New Content, Part 1

Autodesk Revit 2018.1 comes with a significant content update which I think a lot of people will be able to use; especially the new structural content. But even the new appliances and window will be beneficial to many.

There is a lot to talk about so I will break this discussion up into 2 or 3 posts. Today I will cover the appliances. The windows will take a little more time to document... they are powerful, but may not be super intuitive to everyone. So I want to spend a little time to unravel what is going on under the hood.

  • BTW, I had the opportunity to test drive the window content, with some of the Autodesk staff working on this, while I was at Revit: Inside the Factory in Shanghai China last October (2016).

The content is provided...

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Autodesk Structural Precast Extension for Revit 2018

A new structural feature in Revit 2018.1 is the Autodesk Structural Precast Extension for Revit 2018. Available in English, French and German languages at the moment.

This feature/extension leverages Revit's Parts functionality and currently supports the design of solid walls, solid slabs and hollow core slabs (precast plank). I just said "design" but the new tool is also developed to automatically create shop drawings and export CAM files (Unitechnik and PXML) for fabrication.

Check out the detailed BIM and Beam blog post here; click here.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Changing the Revit 2018 Icon


Architect and Revit guru Brian Payne recently had a clever idea and created a custom Revit 2018 icon; here is the Twitter link. He did this because the icon is the same as the Revit 2017 icon, making it more difficult to quickly discern between the two on the desktop or task bar. Using the ICO file Brian provides in the link above and following the steps below you can swap out your icon as well.

As a side note on this topic, as an author I am happy when something superficial like an icon or the UI does not change. It makes updating my books easier. However, as a user, I like Brian's idea and have applied it to my computer.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Revit 2018.1 Deployment Update

To be honest, I did not think we could update a deployment to include service packs and "dot" updates after the "merge" and "append" options were removed from the deployment wizard. I thought we could only update via the Autodesk Desktop App (which looks just like the Google Drive app in the system tray by the way) or with a script.

Turns out we can indeed update a deployment to includes service packs and updates. Once the deployment is done, simply click the Add Updates button shown in the image below. I originally thought this just opened the load Autodesk Desktop App (ADA) tool... silly me.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Revit 2018.1 Options Dialog Changes

With the Revit 2018.1 update installed, you will notice a change in the Options dialog. Today I will cover this change and a few related items.

First, the Graphics tab no longer has information about the graphics card. This has been moved to a new tab called Hardware.

The iamge below compares the new Graphics tab with the old one. In addition to the "hardware" elements being peeled off, the remaining options have been reorganized and a new feature added. I like the added descriptions of what a specific setting does. The new View Navigation Performance section has a new option called Simply display during view navigation. In addition to what you can read in the dialog,
  • Revit Help also says "Improves performance while you navigate a view (using pan, orbit, and zoom) by reducing the amount of detail shown and suspending some graphic effects. When you stop navigating, the details and graphic effects are then displayed."
  • Update: turns out this is not a new feature, but one that was removed in Revit 2016, and only available since then via the Revit.ini, until added back in 2018.1. It was previously called "Use Optimized View Navigation".
Anything to improve performance in Revit is welcomed, thanks Autodesk!

The new Hardware tab lists the graphics card and hardware acceleration options. The warnings appear to be simplified to the Status line. See below for examples of the original warnings.

Friday, July 14, 2017

Browser Organization for Schedules in Revit 2018.1

Yesterday I published a quick post announcing the release of Revit 2018.1, which offers new features between major releases; these mid-year releases do not change the file format of the Revit model. 

However, everyone working in the same Revit model should have the same build of Revit. Yesterday's post mentions around 200 issues were resolved by this update. So 2018.1 is both a new features and service pack update. You don't want one user continually adding a problem to the model and another user, with a newer build, having to fix the problem.

Today, I will run through the ability to organize schedules in the Project Browser. I have been involved in some Revit project, specifically MEP models, with hundreds of schedules. Until now, they were all just listed alphanumerically. We have resorted to adding a prefix to the schedule name to force the schedules into groups; for example, "M_" and "E_". This, then, required the schedule title to be manually overridden as we don't want that prefix to appear in the schedule on the sheets.

To get started, simply right-click on the Schedules/Quantities header in the Project Browser and select Browser Organization.


Similar to how we have been able to organize views, we can sort and filter schedules. In the image below I created a "By Category" option. Brian Payne Tweeted 'So far I have landed on "By Category"'. This is a nice, straightforward option, for sure.

Another option is by the hard-wired Schedule Type... notice the Schedule/Quantities header is appended to indicate the list has a custom organization applied.

Here is the default list of options we can use to Group the list of schedules.

In addition to the list above, we can create a custom parameter to sort the list. In the image below I create a project parameter called Schedule Group.

Using the custom Schedule Group parameter, I set one schedule to "Dan's Schedules" and the rest appear in the "???" section; the same thing happens when Views are sorted this way.

Keep in mind there is now a new way in which something might not show up in Revit... the schedule list can be Filtered. In the image below, we can filter the schedules, in the Project Browser, to only show ones set to a specific Phase. This may confuse some users who are not aware of a filter being applied (again, just like with Views).


I have not tested this, but I assume the applied organization will be saved in the central file and become the default for anyone creating a new local file... which is how things work now with the Views node. Seeing as most firm's have a best practice of creating a new local file everyday, you might find the organization changes. Because of this, having a personal grouping, like the Dan's Schedules example above, may not make you too popular in the office!

By the way, the addition of this feature is directly tied to this Revit Idea were you can see the number of votes, the "Under Review" and "Accepted" status designations; Click here to see that post!

Please comment below if you have anything to add... keep in mind I have to present a "What's New in Revit 2018" at BILT-NA in Toronto, so I want to know ALL the details:)

Thursday, July 13, 2017

The Revit 2018.1 Update is Live

Revit 2018.1, the first round of incremental new features has now hit the streets. In the past this mid-version update what characterized as "for subscription customers only". While that is still technically true, you can't be using Revit 2018 unless you are on subscription... so everyone has access in a sense.

Check out the details on the Revit bloghttp://blogs.autodesk.com/revit/2017/07/12/revit-2018-1-update-now-available/ 

Sign up for this webinar to learn more about the new features: https://pages.autodesk.com/Whats-New-in-Revit2018.1-Jul.html

Be sure to check these links out as well:

I plan on posting some additional examples in the next few days. One of the most exciting is the ability to organize schedules in the Project Browser!!!

Simple out line of new features:

Architecture and Core
  1. Dynamo Player Inputs – support for scripts with inputs directly in the player.
  2. Schedule organization in the Project browser – one of the top idea site requests.
  3. Changes to the Graphics Hardware Certification (Hardware tab) in Options (now two tabs, Graphics and Hardware)
  4. New Content – new windows, appliances, and system furniture (cubicles) will be available for download separately on the web. 
  5. Materials API – the ability to edit and create materials via the API
  6. Quality improvements – about ~200 ish fixes and stability improvements based on customer reports

Structural
  1. Freeform Reinforcement – ability to place reinforcement in almost any kind of surface
  2. Autodesk Structural Precast Extension for Revit – Automates the Design to Fabrication workflow
  3. New content for Flat, Round, Square bars (USA, Canada, Europe, India) for bracings/railings
  4. South African Steel content (I-shapes, angles, pipes, channels.
  5. SANS 50025/BS EN10025 support

MEP

  1. Sloped Pipe in Multipoint Routing
  2. Dynamic Holes – automatically layout holes in flat sheets for fabrication
  3. Fabrication Reports and Worksheets - can modify new/existing CADmep reports in Revit
  4. API for Fabrication Centerline length
  5. API for creating a MAJ file

Carol Bartz and Phil Bernstein Signed my First Revit Book

Back in 2003 Autodesk was holding "Executive Briefings" around the United States. The main speakers were Autodesk's CEO Carol Bartz and Vice President Phil Bernstein.

I planned on attending the event held in Minneapolis. The timing was interesting as I had just finished writing my first Revit textbook. I called my publisher, Stephen Schroff at SDC Publications, and asked when the printed books would be ready. I was hoping to bring a couple to the event. Unfortunately the books would not be read in time, however Stephen offered to have three copies printed and bound separately!

I showed up not know what to expect, but found an opportunity to talk to both Carol and Phil about my new book. Anticipating writing this post 14 years later, I asked them both to sign the cover of the book (ok, just kidding) and then also gave them a copy.

Below is a scanned image of my very first, and I mean the very first copy, Revit book signed by Carol Bartz and Phil Bernstein.


As we all know, it is a small world, and as such there are two interesting facts about Carol, Phil and myself...

Like myself, 3M, Best Buy, Target and Caribou Coffee... Carol is originally from Minnesota. I actually just learned this from the Wikipedia page linked above (it must be true, it is on Wikipedia).

  • BTW, Carol went on to be the CEO of Yahoo.

Prior to working at Autodesk, Phil Bernstein worked at Cesar Pelli's office. Indirectly, Phil and I worked on the same project. He wrote the contract for the University of Minnesota - Duluth (UMD) Weber Music Hall. I worked on that project, drawing architectural details, wall sections and such, while working for the firm that was the local architect of record (FYI, I worked for SJA, which was acquired by TKDA). Click here to learn a little more about this beautiful project: https://sfa.d.umn.edu/about/departments/department-music/about-music/music-facilities.

  • BTW, Phil now a Fellow at Autodesk and a lecturer at Yale.

A fun little walk down memory lane... I hope you enjoyed it!

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Free AutoSave add-in for Revit

I was exchanging emails with Dmitry Chubrik recently, and he told me about a new Revit add-in his company BIM2B just released. It is called R AutoSave and is available for free via the Autodesk app store.

I installed on my work computer and have done a little testing. I opened a model, made a few changes and then after the specified "Autosave interval" I manually crashed Revit. When you attempt to open the same model you are prompted to use the Autosaved model or the (older) file you have selected (see image below). When I selected the "restore unsaved changes" option, all of my changes appeared!



Rather than spelling out the various options and scenarios, I will just point you to Dmitry's blog post announcing this add-in, as he gets into all of the nitty gritty. Follow this link to read more: http://bim2b.ru/bim2b-autosave-for-revit

One more quick comment... I don't recall seeing an add-in that integrates into the Options dialog as shown below... pretty cool.


I have to do some more testing to see if I want to roll this out to staff. Losing work is never good and this tool could save a ton of time. So it is definitely worth a look, and the price is right.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

AutoCAD Textbook; Residential Design

In addition to 5 books on Revit, I also have a book on AutoCAD. Actually, I have written 3 books around AutoCAD but only one remains viable. Here is the rundown on my updated residential design AutoCAD book...



Residential Design Using AutoCAD 2018
Free Chapter: click here (PDF)
Sample Video: click here
Table of Contents: click here (PDF)
Purchase Options: click here (hard copy and eBook options)

Free Examination Copy: Instructors in the USA and Canada can request a free examination copy; click here.

Key Features

  • Designed for new users of AutoCAD 2018
  • Project based tutorials design a house from start to finish using AutoCAD 2018
  • Includes access to extensive video instruction
  • Bonus material covers must know commands, sketching exercises, a roof study workbook and more

    In Detail

    Residential Design Using AutoCAD 2018 is an introductory level tutorial which uses residential design exercises as the means to teach you AutoCAD 2018. Each book comes with access to extensive video instruction in which the author explains the most common tools and techniques used when designing residential buildings using AutoCAD 2018. After completing this book you will have a well-rounded knowledge of Computer Aided Drafting that can be used in the industry and the satisfaction of having completed a set of residential drawings.

    This textbook starts with a basic introduction to AutoCAD 2018. The first three chapters are intended to get you familiar with the user interface and the most common menus and tools. Throughout the rest of the book you will design a residence through to its completion.

    Using step-by-step tutorial lessons, the residential project is followed through to create elevations, sections, details, etc. Throughout the project, new AutoCAD commands are covered at the appropriate time. Focus is placed on the most essential parts of a command rather than an exhaustive review of every sub-feature of a particular command. The Appendix contains a bonus section covering the fundamental principles of engineering graphics that relate to architecture.

    This book also comes with extensive video instruction as well as bonus chapters that cover must know commands, sketching exercises, a roof study workbook and much more.

    About the Videos

    Each book includes access to extensive video training created by author Daniel Stine. The videos make it easy to see the exact menu selections made by the author while he describes how and why each step is made making it straightforward and simple to learn AutoCAD.

    These videos allow you to become familiar with the menu selections and techniques before you begin the tutorial. By watching these videos you will be more confident in what you are doing and have a better understanding of the desired outcome of each lesson.

    See the inside front cover for instructions on how to redeem your access code and access this book’s exclusive bonus content.

    Details

    Published May 15, 2017
    432 Pages
    Binding: Paperback
    Printing: Black and White
    Print ISBN: 978-1-63057-092-7 | ISBN 10: 1630570923
    eBook ISBN: 978-1-63056-368-4

    Table of Contents

    1. Getting started with AutoCAD 2018
    2. Crash Course Introduction (The Basics)
    3. Drawing Architectural Objects (Draw & Modify)
    4. Floor Plans
    5. Exterior Elevations
    6. Sections
    7. Plan Layout & Interior Elevations
    8. Site Plan
    9. Schedules & Set Up Sheet
    10. Lineweights & Plotting
      Index
    11. Exclusive Bonus Chapters
      1. Introduction to Computers
      2. Introduction: Must Know Commands
        Appendix A: Engineering Graphics
        Appendix B: Roof Study Workbook - Draft Edition
        Appendix C: Sketching Exercises

    Monday, July 10, 2017

    Revit Textbooks; Command Reference

    Our 'command reference' book has been updated for Revit 2018... below are the details. This book is available July 14.



    Autodesk Revit 2018 Architectural Command Reference
    Free Chapter: click here (PDF)
    Sample Video: click here
    Table of Contents: click here (PDF)
    Purchase Options: click here (hard copy and eBook options)

    Free Examination Copy: Instructors in the USA and Canada can request a free examination copy; click here.

    Key Features

    • Comprehensive coverage of Autodesk Revit’s commands and features
    • Essential desk reference for users of all levels
    • Organized in the same way the Revit user interface is presented
    • Contains expert user tips and tricks throughout the book
    • Includes access to nearly 100 video tutorials

      In Detail

      This book provides you with an easy to use reference for all of Autodesk Revit’s Architectural Commands. This command reference can be used as you are working in the software to help you understand what each command does and how it may be used in your overall workflow. Also included with this book are nearly 100 video tutorials which will further help you master Autodesk Revit.

      The book is organized in the same way the Revit user interface is presented. Each tab of the Ribbon is represented as a chapter in the book. Within the chapter each button is represented in the book as it appears on the Ribbon from left to right. Organizing the book in this way makes it easy to locate each command in the book and understand its use.

      For each command entry you will see a brief description of what the tool will do, how it is used, and the options you will be given as you use the tool. In some cases the author’s suggestions or tips about the use of the tool will also be presented. As you learn the tools in Revit you may not need to read the full entry on the tool. To help facilitate this, many of the tools include a “Quick Steps” section to explain the tools and options in outline form.

      This book will help facilitate your learning of the Revit interface and all of the commands. For more experienced users, the command reference may introduce you to commands you have not used before or help you with commands you use less frequently. Whatever level of user you are, this command reference becomes a valuable resource to you as you work with Revit.

      About the Videos

      Access to nearly 100 videos, almost five hours of content, is also included with your purchase of this book. These videos break down each topic into several short videos so that you can easily navigate to a specific aspect of a tool or feature in Autodesk Revit. This makes the videos both a powerful learning tool and convenient video reference.

      Details

      Available July 14, 2017
      752 Pages
      Binding: Paperback
      Printing: Black and White
      Print ISBN: 978-1-63057-096-5 | ISBN 10: 1630570966
      eBook ISBN: 978-1-63056-387-5

      Table of Contents

      1. Introduction
      2. File Tab and User Interface
      3. Architecture Tab
      4. Structure Tab
      5. Insert Tab
      6. Annotate Tab
      7. Analyze Tab
      8. Massing and Site Tab
      9. Collaborate Tab
      10. View Tab
      11. Manage Tab
      12. Modify Tab
      13. Contextual Tab

      Sunday, July 9, 2017

      Revit 2018 Textbooks; Commercial Design

      My 'commercial design' book has been updated for Revit 2018... below are the details. This book first come out for Revit 5.0 in 2003; this was the second Revit textbook ever written. It has been updated and expanded over the years, but it is still based on the same building.



      Commercial Design Using Autodesk Revit 2018
      Free Chapter: click here (PDF)
      Sample Video: click here
      Table of Contents: click here (PDF)
      Purchase Options: click here (hard copy and eBook options)

      Free Examination Copy: Instructors in the USA and Canada can request a free examination copy; click here.

      Key Features

      • Starts at an introductory level
      • Project based tutorials design an office building from start to finish
      • Includes access to nearly 100 video tutorials
      • Bonus material covers Revit Certification, Insight 360, finding missing elements and much more
      • Helps you prepare for the Autodesk Revit Architecture Certification Exam

        In Detail

        Commercial Design Using Autodesk Revit 2018 is designed for the architectural student using Revit 2018. The intent is to provide you with a well-rounded knowledge of tools and techniques for use in both school and industry. This text takes a project based approach to learning Revit's architectural tools in which you develop a three story office building. Each book also includes access to nearly 100 video tutorials designed to further help you master Autodesk Revit. General building codes and industry standard conventions are covered in a way that is applicable to the current exercise.

        The first two chapters are intended to get you familiar with the user interface and many of the common menus and tools of Revit 2018. A small office is created in chapter two to show you just how easy it is to get started using Autodesk Revit. By the end of chapter two you will be excited and prepared to take on a much larger project.

        Throughout the rest of the book you develop a three story office building. The drawings start with the floor plans and develop all the way to photo-realistic renderings like the one on the cover of this book. In these chapters many of the architectural tools and features of Revit 2018 are covered in greater detail.

        About the Videos

        Access to nearly 100 videos, almost five hours of content, is also included with your purchase of this book. These videos break down each topic into several short videos so that you can easily navigate to a specific aspect of a tool or feature in Autodesk Revit. This makes the videos both a powerful learning tool and convenient video reference. The videos make it easy to see the menu selections and will make learning Revit straightforward and simple. It's like having the author by your side showing you exactly how to use all the major tools in Autodesk Revit.

        Details

        By Daniel John Stine CSI, CDT
        Published May 24, 2017
        624 Pages
        Binding: Paperback
        Printing: Black and White
        Print ISBN: 978-1-63057-094-1 | ISBN 10: 163057094X
        eBook ISBN: 978-1-63056-377-6

        Table of Contents

        1. Getting Started with Autodesk Revit 2018
        2. Quick Start: Small Office
        3. Floor Plan (First Floor)
        4. Floor Plans (Second & Third Floors)
        5. Vertical Circulation
        6. Roof
        7. Floor Systems & Reflected Ceiling Plans
        8. Interior & Exterior Elevations
        9. Annotation
        10. Sections & Details
        11. Interior Design
        12. Schedules
        13. Site and Rendering
        14. Construction Documents Set
        15. Introduction to Revit Content Creation
        16. Introduction to Phasing and Worksharing

          Exclusive Bonus Content
        17. Introduction to Computers
          Appendix A: Autodesk Revit Architecture Certification Exam
          Appendix B - Roof Study Workbook
          Appendix C - Finding Missing Elements in Revit
          Appendix D - Building Performance Analysis In Revit And Insight 360

        Saturday, July 8, 2017

        Revit 2018 Textbooks; Design Integration

        My 'design integration' book has been updated for Revit 2018... below are the details. This book provides an introduction to architecture, interior design, structural, mechanical, electrical and plumbing; thus. offering a well rounded overview of Revit's features for students and professionals.

        Design Integration Using Autodesk Revit 2018
        Free Chapter: click here (PDF)
        Sample Video: click here
        Table of Contents: click here (PDF)
        Purchase Options: click here (hard copy and eBook options)

        Free Examination Copy: Instructors in the USA and Canada can request a free examination copy; click here.

        Key Features

        • Combines all three disciplines of Autodesk Revit into one book
        • Guides you through creating a two story law office while teaching you the BIM process
        • Uses step-by-step tutorials and starts at an introductory level
        • Includes access to extensive video instruction and bonus chapters
        • Bonus chapters include an introduction to lighting design, Revit certification, building performance analysis and much more

          In Detail

          Design Integration Using Autodesk Revit 2018 is designed to provide you with a well-rounded knowledge of Autodesk Revit tools and techniques. All three disciplines of the Revit platform are introduced in this textbook. This approach gives you a broad overview of the Building Information Modeling (BIM) process. The topics cover the design integration of most of the building disciplines: Architectural, Interior Design, Structural, Mechanical, Plumbing and Electrical. Civil is not covered, but adding topography to your model is. Each book also includes access to nearly 100 video tutorials designed to further help you master Autodesk Revit.

          Throughout the book you develop a two story law office. The drawings start with the floor plans and develop all the way to photo-realistic renderings similar to the one on the cover of this book. Along the way the building’s structure, ductwork, plumbing and electrical (power and lighting) are modeled. By the end, you will have a thorough knowledge of many of the Revit basics needed to be productive in a classroom or office environment. Even if you will only be working with one component of Revit in your chosen profession, this book will give you important knowledge on how the other disciplines will be doing their work and valuable insight into the overall process.

          The first four chapters cover many of the Revit basics needed to successfully and efficiently work with the software. Once the fundamentals are covered, the remaining chapters walk you through a building project which is started from scratch so nothing is taken for granted by you or the author.

          About the Bonus Material

          Each book comes with access to the following:

          • Extensive video instruction shows you how to use all the major tools in Autodesk Revit.
          • Bonus chapters include an introduction to Revit Families, Rooms and Spaces, Lighting Design, Autodesk Showcase and much more.
          • A bonus draft copy of the Roof Study Workbook which includes information on controlling the top surface of the roof in Revit

          As an instructor, the author understands that many students in a classroom setting have varying degrees of computer experience. To help level the playing field an entire bonus chapter is devoted to an introduction to computers. Much of the basics are covered, from computer hardware and software to file management procedures: including step-by-step instructions on using a flash drive.

          About the Videos

          Access to nearly 100 videos, almost five hours of content, is also included with your purchase of this book. These videos break down each topic into several short videos so that you can easily navigate to a specific aspect of a tool or feature in Autodesk Revit. This makes the videos both a powerful learning tool and convenient video reference. The videos make it easy to see the menu selections and will make learning Revit straightforward and simple. It's like having the author by your side showing you exactly how to use all the major tools in Autodesk Revit.

          Details

          By Daniel John Stine CSI, CDT
          Published June 27, 2017
          900 Pages
          Binding: Paperback
          Printing: Black and White
          Print ISBN: 978-1-63057-099-6 | ISBN 10: 1630570990
          eBook ISBN: 978-1-63056-381-3

          Table of Contents

          1. Getting Started with Autodesk Revit 2018
          2. Quick Start: Small Office
          3. Revit Basics: Overview of Linework and Modify Tools
          4. Revit Basics: Drawing 2D Architectural Content
          5. Floor Plans
          6. Roof, Floors and Ceilings
          7. Vertical Circulation
          8. Structural System
          9. Annotation
          10. Elevations, Sections and Details
          11. Interior Design
          12. Schedules
          13. Mechanical System
          14. Electrical System
          15. Site and Renderings
          16. Construction Documents Set
          17. Revit Families: Introduction to Revit Content Creation
          18. Introduction to Phasing and Worksharing

            Exclusive Bonus Chapters
          19. Introduction to Computers for CAD/BIM Users
            Appendix A: Autodesk Revit Architecture Certification Exam
            Appendix B: Finding Missing Elements in Revit
            Appendix C: Roof Study Workbook
            Appendix D: Rooms and Spaces; Revit’s Unbuilt Elements
            Appendix E: Lighting Design in Revit using ElumTools
            Appendix F: Introduction to working with 3D PDF
            Appendix G: Building Performance Analysis in Revit 2018 R2 and Insight 360
          A few project images (click to enlarge)



          Friday, July 7, 2017

          Revit 2018 Textbooks; Interior Design

          My interior design book has been updated for Revit 2018... below are the details. Be sure to check out the free 50+ page introduction to materials sample chapter.

          • FYI: I used Enscape again this year to create new cover art.




          Interior Design Using Autodesk Revit 2018
          Free Chapter: click here (PDF)
          Sample Video: click here
          Table of Contents: click here (PDF)
          Purchase Options: click here

          Free Examination Copy: Instructors in the USA and Canada can request a free examination copy; click here.

          Key Features

          • Designed specifically for interior designers
          • No previous experience with Autodesk Revit is required
          • Uses a project based, tutorial style approach
          • Includes access to extensive video instruction and bonus content
          • Helps you prepare for the Autodesk Revit Architecture Certification Exam

            In Detail

            The intent of this book is to provide the interior design student a well-rounded knowledge of Autodesk Revit tools and techniques. These skills can then be applied to enhance professional development in both academia and industry. Each book also includes access to nearly 100 video tutorials designed to further help you master Autodesk Revit.

            The overall premise of the book is to help you learn Revit while developing the interior of a two story law office. At the start of the book you are provided an architectural model with established columns, beams, exterior walls, minimal interior walls and roofs in which to work. This allows more emphasis to be placed on interior design rather than primary architectural elements. The chapters chronology generally follows the typical design process. You will find this book helps you more accurately and efficiently develop your design ideas and skills.

            The first chapter introduces you to Revit, Building Information Modeling (BIM) and the basics of opening, saving and creating a new project. The second provides a quick introduction to modeling basic elements in Revit including walls, doors, windows and more. This chapter is designed to show you how powerful Revit truly is and to get you excited for the rest of the book.

            The remainder of the book is spent developing the interior space of the law office with an established space program. You will learn how to view and navigate within the provided 3D architectural model, managing and creating materials and develop spaces with walls, doors and windows. Once all the spaces are added to the model, several areas are explored and used as the basis to cover Revit commands and workflows.

            At the end of this tutorial, you will be able to model floor finishes, ceilings with soffits, casework, custom reception desk, restrooms, furniture and light fixtures. Additional features such as tags, schedules and photorealistic rendering will be covered.

            About the Videos

            Access to nearly 100 videos, almost five hours of content, is also included with your purchase of this book. These videos break down each topic into several short videos so that you can easily navigate to a specific aspect of a tool or feature in Autodesk Revit. This makes the videos both a powerful learning tool and convenient video reference. The videos make it easy to see the menu selections and will make learning Revit straightforward and simple. It's like having the author by your side showing you exactly how to use all the major tools in Autodesk Revit.

            Details

            Published June 19, 2017
            836 Pages
            Binding: Paperback
            Printing: Black and White
            Print ISBN: 978-1-63057-103-0 | ISBN 10: 1630571032
            eBook ISBN: 978-1-63056-375-2

            Table of Contents

            1. Getting Started with Autodesk Revit Architecture 2018
            2. Model Navigation
            3. Quick Start: Small Office
            4. Revit Materials
            5. Programming
            6. Floor Plans
            7. Curtain Wall
            8. Stairs and Railings
            9. Ceilings
            10. Break Room and Work Room
            11. Toilet Room Design
            12. Floors
            13. Custom Reception Desk and Sign
            14. Furniture, Groups and Design Options
            15. Detailing
            16. Schedules
            17. Lighting and Rendering
            18. Sheets and Revisions
            19. Introduction to Phasing and Worksharing
            20. Revit Families: Introduction to Revit Content Creation

              Exclusive Bonus Content

              Appendix A: Autodesk Revit Architecture Certification Exam
              Appendix B: Revit Basics: Overview of Linework and Modify Tools
              Appendix C: Revit Basics: Drawing 2D Architectural Content
              Appendix D: Finding Missing Elements in Revit
              Appendix E: Introduction to Computers for CAD/BIM Users
              Appendix F: Revit and 3D PDFs
              Appendix G: Lighting Design in Revit using ElumTools
              Appendix H: Building Performance Analysis
              Appendix S: Introduction to Autodesk Showcase

            Thursday, July 6, 2017

            Revit 2018 Textbooks; Residential Design

            All of my Revit 2018 books are now updated, edited by the publisher, printed and ready for distribution! Seeing as my books are used throughout the education market, they need to be ready to go by Fall Semester so students have the correct book for the version of software they are using.

            The next few posts will highlight each of my 2018 textbooks. Today's post covers the #1 Revit textbook in the USA in the academic market (based on an independent research group); Residential Design Using Autodesk Revit 2018.

            FYI: I used Enscape again this year to create new cover art. I used the then beta version with a nice new grass feature. I wrote about this new feature here: click here.

            Free Chapter: click here
            Sample Video: click here
            Table of Contents: click here
            Purchase Options: click here

            Free Examination Copy: Instructors in the USA and Canada can request a free examination copy; click here.

            Key Features

            • Starts at an introductory level
            • Project based tutorials design a house from start to finish
            • Includes access to extensive video training
            • Bonus material covers Revit certification, finding missing elements, and much more
            • Helps you prepare for the Autodesk Revit Architecture Certification Exam

            In Detail

            Residential Design Using Autodesk Revit 2018 is designed for users completely new to Autodesk Revit. This text takes a project based approach to learning Autodesk Revit’s architectural tools in which you develop a single family residence all the way to photorealistic renderings like the one on the cover. Each book also includes access to extensive video training designed to further help you master Autodesk Revit.

            The lessons begin with a basic introduction to Autodesk Revit 2018. The first four chapters are intended to get you familiar with the user interface and many of the common menus and tools.

            Throughout the rest of the book a residential building is created and most of Autodesk Revit’s tools and features are covered in greater detail. Using step-by-step tutorial lessons, the residential project is followed through to create elevations, sections, floor plans, renderings, construction sets, etc.

            About the Videos

            Access to extensive video training is also included with your purchase of this book. These videos break down each topic into several short videos so that you can easily navigate to a specific aspect of a tool or feature in Autodesk Revit. This makes the videos both a powerful learning tool and convenient video reference. The videos make it easy to see the menu selections and will make learning Revit straightforward and simple. It’s like having the author by your side showing you exactly how to use all the major tools in Autodesk Revit.

            Details

            Published May 19, 2017
            682 Pages
            Binding: Paperback
            Printing: Black and White
            Print ISBN: 978-1-63057-106-1 | ISBN 10: 1630571067
            eBook ISBN: 978-1-63056-376-9

            Table of Contents

            1. Getting Started with Revit 2018
            2. Lake Cabin: Floor Plan
            3. Overview of Linework and Modify Tools
            4. Drawing 2D Architectural Objects
            5. Floor Plans (First Floor)
            6. Second Floor and Basement Plans
            7. Annotation
            8. Roof
            9. Floor Systems and Reflected Ceiling Plans
            10. Elevations
            11. Sections
            12. Interior Design
            13. Schedules
            14. Site Tools & Photo-Realistic Rendering
            15. Construction Documents Set
            16. Introduction to Phasing and Worksharing
            17. Introduction to Revit Content Creation

              Exclusive Bonus Chapters (accessed online via provided code)
            18. Introduction to Computers
              Appendix A: Engineering Graphics
              Appendix B: Autodesk Revit Certification Exam
              Appendix C: Roof Study Workbook - Draft Edition
              Appendix D: Finding Missing Elements in Revit
              Appendix E: Introduction to Hand Sketching

            Tuesday, June 20, 2017

            Render Appearance Search Path

            The problem with using content downloaded from the internet is that families do not contain any of the textures, aka image files or render appearance images, used in the materials. This becomes evident when you render and see a list of missing render appearance images as shown in the image below.
            That textures are also missing is evident by the exclamation mark symbol in the Material dialog. Notice the image preview area, in the image below, is bright red with this attention getting symbol.
            Some manufactures, such as Herman Miller, offer a download link for their materials/textures. However, this is really only useful for the materials already defined in the family. With furniture, for example, there are lots of material options. The definition of the material is more than just the texture itself; image scale, cutouts, reflections, etc. To help with this challenge, Herman Miller also offers a Revit Material Library as shown in the image from their website below.

            • I wish more manufacturers would offer Material libraries; some don't even offer the texture files.

            The image files can be saved to a common folder on your network. An important step to make sure the materials see the appearance textures, is to specify the path via Options as shown below. This is also important to set, so the materials are found when rendering; Revit does not just search your hand drive and entire network looking for these missing item; and your location is not likely to be the same as the folks from Herman Miller who made the content.
            Once the path is set properly, Revit should be able to find the textures. In the image below, notice the texture size and cutout information are part of what define the material... not just the image file itself. Also, some manufactures even fill out the Identity tab information. The Herman Miller Material Library does not appear to add the identity information; which is a missed marketing opportunity.
            My book, Interior Design using Autodesk Revit 2018, touches on the use of content and textures from manufactures.

            There is a lot more to say on this subject, but that will be for future posts.

            Saturday, June 17, 2017

            Revit's Section Box Tips and Tricks

            Fun fact: I wrote this post in-flight between Minneapolis and Amsterdam, in route to visit my family's past Russian exchange students--and ultimately posted this from St. Petersburg, Russia. I had mentioned this impending trip in a speaker spotlight interview for BILT-NA in Toronto.

            There are a number of tips and tricks related to Revit’s Section Box feature. I will share several of them in this post. Please add any additional tips you may have in the comments section below.

            A Section Box can be activated in a 3D or Camera view via Properties as shown in the image below.
            Once activated, and selected, each of the six sides of the Section Box can be adjusted using the grips. The grips are always centered on each face.
            About those grips… they can be hard to find and tricky to select. Knowing they are always in the center helps in locating them. If you click and miss the grip, the Section Box deselects—which is a pain. Notice the grip is composed of two arrows? If you single-click one side, or the other, the Section Box face will adjust a slight amount in the direction selected.

            In addition to the six grips, there is also a quick access Rotation icon, see the image above.

            For more control in sizing and rotating the Section Box, I like to adjust it in plan, elevation and section views. You can make the Section Box visible by selecting it in the 3D view and then using Ctrl+Tab to step through the open views. This requires the plan or elevation view to already be open. Additionally, the Section Box will become deselected if you step into another project or family.

            Another option is to open the plan or elevation view and then right-click on the 3D view in the Project Browser as shown in the image below. Any 3D or Camera view with Section Box checked will show this option.

            Once selected, you can drag a side to be more accurately centered on a wall (in plan) or above/below a floor (in elevation).
            When the Section Box is selected, in a plan view, use the rotate command. The angled element in the next two images is a good example of when rotating a Section Box can be helpful.
             In this example, the floor cut aligns with the element and the adjacent columns are excluded.
            Another great way to leverage the Section Box tool is via the Selection Box command. Select one or more elements, as in the image below, and then click the Selection Box command.
            The result is your default 3D view is opened and the Section Box is turned on and adjusted around the selected elements as shown in the next image.
            In general, I like to think of this as a “throw-away” Section Box. Seeing as it is applied to the default 3D view, I am guessing that was the developers intent as well. When done with this Section Box, just turn it off. A view does not remember a previous position of an adjusted Section Box… thus, whenever it is toggled back on, it will reset to align with the extents of the model. If you want to save a Section Box adjustment, for future review, or to place on a sheet, simply make a copy of the default 3D view.
             Of course, the Section Box can be adjusted as needed,,,
            If the cropped view will be placed on a sheet you may want to turn off the Section Box visibility via Visibility/Graphics Overrides.
            As long as the original element(s) is within the Section Box, it is possible to use the Displace Elements command to preposition items outside of the Section Box as shown in the image below.
            Finally, the Section Box can be used to save a lot of time when rendering a still image in Revit. I talked about this in the ArchVision webinar... click here to see my post about that and watch the recording.

            Wednesday, June 14, 2017

            Revit Material: Material Name in a Family

            How can we easily share materials between families? There are a few different ways to approach this depending on your needs. One is to create a custom material library, another is to use Transfer Project Standards.

            If the Material is already setup in the project environment, it will NOT be changed when loading families with the same materials. Revit assumes the project is correct and will not change that material every time a family is loaded. With that knowledge, all you really have to do is make a dummy material with the correct name, load it into a project with the correct material (i.e. identity, graphics, appearance, etc. settings) and then open that family for editing. Now you have a family with the same settings.

            On a related note, one could also use the Revit Family Processor (by CTC Express Tools) to quickly add, delete or change Materials in several families at once. This has some limitations (due to the API as I understand it) but can definitely help. The image below shows how one might add a Material name (LHB Maple in this example) to several families.

            • FYI: The Family Processor is a great way to get rid of all the default Materials loaded in your content (which came from the family templates).


            Tuesday, June 13, 2017

            Image Defines Transparency in Revit Material

            Quick post today... an image file can be used to define a transparency in a render appearance asset as shown in the first image below. This could represent an etched or vinyl pattern on glass.

            The lighter areas of the image are more transparent than the darker areas. Click on the image preview to adjust the size of the image (i.e. the pattern on the glass).

            The result can be seen in this 3D view from a healthcare project...

            Monday, June 12, 2017

            Creating a Fence Material and Finding Local Assets

            When you need a new material, searching the project and Autodesk libraries is the best place to start (see image below). Sometimes a material does not exist, as in this “fence” example, but an Appearance Asset does; which will get you part of the way there.
            Searching for a material
            Searching the Asset library reveals a chain-link fence option.
            Searching for an asset
            When this asset is loaded into a Material, it contains several settings, such as image size, cutout and Bump.
            Adding a cutout image for a chain-link fence material
            The image below shows the images used to create a fence render appearance (visible in realistic and rendered views). For these images, I did a Google “Images” search and quickly found a tillable image of a fence. Then I made a copy of the image, edited it in Photoshop to look like the second image below (which took about one minute), and then assigned this image as the “cutout” on the Appearance tab. The black areas in the cutout image are the transparent portions as seen in the rendered image on the right.
            Combining main image and coutout image to produce result shown on right
            For the fence example, you would still need to manually add the Identify and Graphics information manually. For example, the surface pattern and Texture Alignment (to make the drafting views and rendered views align).

            Another cutout example...
            Back rest mesh material: cutout: Furnishings.Fabrics.Netting.Mask.jpg

            Surface pattern texture alignment
            Another thing you can do is search the materials and textures folders on the hard drive. The image below shows the results from searching for “fencing” at this location (in Windows Explorer): C:\Program Files (x86)\Common Files\Autodesk Shared\Materials

            As you can see there are several “fence” options not revealed in our previous searches (discussed above).
            Searching the materials folder via windows explorer
            • TIP: Switch to thumbnail preview mode to see the images.
            You can even search in the Revit dialog’s as shown below.
            Searching within the Revit open/load dialog